The Route of the Confederate Wagon Train Through Monterey Pass

Looking from south of Fairfield headed on modern day Iron Springs Road, the wagon train of General Richard Ewell's corps made its way through the South Mountain range.
Looking from south of Fairfield headed on modern day Iron Springs Road, the wagon train of General Richard Ewell’s corps made its way through the South Mountain range.
This is Gum Springs Road and it is the same roadway that the Confederate army used during the retreat.
This is Gum Springs Road and it is the same roadway that the Confederate army used during the retreat.
This is the approch to Fairfield Gap. This is where modern day Maria Furnace, Gum Springs and Furnace Road come together. The Confederate wagon train would have turned right onto Maria Furnace Road. This is also the area where portions of the 1st Michigan cavalry attacked portions of the 11th Virginia and 5th North Carolina cavalry. During the retreat, this is the same area where General Jubal Early's Division was fired on upon Union artillery.
This is the approch to Fairfield Gap. This is where modern day Maria Furnace, Gum Springs and Furnace Road come together. The Confederate wagon train would have turned right onto Maria Furnace Road. This is also the area where portions of the 1st Michigan cavalry attacked portions of the 11th Virginia and 5th North Carolina cavalry.
During the retreat, this is the same area where General Jubal Early’s Division was fired on upon Union artillery.
This is another photo showing where the Maria Furnace Road entered Fairfield Gap. Today this is a private driveway.
This is another photo showing where the Maria Furnace Road entered Fairfield Gap. Today this is a private driveway.
A portion of the Maria Furnace Road. This road connected Fairfield Gap to Monterey Pass and is about a mile and a half to two miles long. Many Confederate soldiers wrote about their experiences here during the retreat.
A portion of the Maria Furnace Road. This road connected Fairfield Gap to Monterey Pass and is about a mile and a half to two miles long. Many Confederate soldiers wrote about their experiences here during the retreat.
The brick building in the center of the photo is the toll house. The Confederate wagon trains entered the Emmitsburg and Waynesboro Turnpike at this point. The Maria Furnace Road connected to the turnpike in front of the toll house. Mentzers Gap Road connect behind. This photo was taken from Pendersville Road which also was here during the battle. Over five roads connected to Monterey Pass during the battle.
The brick building in the center of the photo is the toll house. The Confederate wagon trains entered the Emmitsburg and Waynesboro Turnpike at this point. The Maria Furnace Road connected to the turnpike in front of the toll house. Mentzers Gap Road connect behind. This photo was taken from Pendersville Road which also was here during the battle. Over five roads connected to Monterey Pass during the battle.
Just another photo showing the roadway as it ran along the mountain toward Rouzerville which was known as Pikesville during the battle. Buena Visita Road would be the marking point to the bottom of the mountain for many wagons that were overturned.
Just another photo showing the roadway as it ran along the mountain toward Rouzerville which was known as Pikesville during the battle. Buena Visita Road would be the marking point to the bottom of the mountain for many wagons that were overturned.
This is Pikesville or Rouzerville as it is called today. Waterloo is not far from here.
This is Pikesville or Rouzerville as it is called today. Waterloo is not far from here.
This is Waterloo along Waterloo Road. After coming off the mountain, the Confederate wagon train continued onward toward Maryland using Waterloo Road to what is now called Harbaugh Church Road.
This is Waterloo along Waterloo Road. After coming off the mountain, the Confederate wagon train continued onward toward Maryland using Waterloo Road to what is now called Harbaugh Church Road.
This is the Harbaugh Farm. Along this roadway, laid the ruins of wagons destroyed by the battle of Monterey Pass.
This is the Harbaugh Farm. Along this roadway, laid the ruins of wagons destroyed by the battle of Monterey Pass.
From Harbuagh Church Road, the Confederate wagon train turned onto modern day Midvale Road as it made its way into Maryland. Ringgold is less than two miles away.
From Harbuagh Church Road, the Confederate wagon train turned onto modern day Midvale Road as it made its way into Maryland. Ringgold is less than two miles away.
Looking from the square of Ringgold, hundreds of wagons would have been seen from this point. The mountain area in the distance is Monterey Pass.
Looking from the square of Ringgold, hundreds of wagons would have been seen from this point. The mountain area in the distance is Monterey Pass.
Looking toward Ringgold from near Leitersburg.
Looking toward Ringgold from near Leitersburg.
This is the sqaure of Leitersburg. It was here that the 1st Vermont Cavalry coming in from Smithsburg attacked. From here the wagon train continued onward toward Williamsport via Hagerstown.
This is the sqaure of Leitersburg. It was here that the 1st Vermont Cavalry coming in from Smithsburg attacked. From here the wagon train continued onward toward Williamsport via Hagerstown.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Round about directions:

Starting out in Fairfield, turn right onto Iron Springs Road and follow to Gum Springs Road.

Turn right onto Gum Springs Road and continue up the mountain. In Franklin County, Gum Springs Road turns into Furnace Road.

Follow Furnace Road until you get to Old Waynesboro/Charmian Road.

Verring right onto Charmian Road, continue until you get to Route 16.

Proceed straight onto Old Waynesboro Road and follow down the mountain.

The last curve veer left onto Waterloo Road. Follow Waterloo Road to the intersection of Harbaugh Road and Penmar Road. Proceed straight onto Harbaugh Church Road.

Follow Harbaugh Church to Midvale Road.

Turn left and cross into Maryland and follow to four way stop.

Proceed straight and turn follow Maryland Civil War trails sign to your left into Leitersburg.

 

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