Battlefield Journal: Kilpatrick’s Movements to Monterey Pass

This is a small tour of the Union cavalry advance toward Monterey Pass during the afternoon of July 4th to the morning of July 5th just after the West Virginians break through the Confederate battle line.

Starting at Old Waynesboro Road and Route 16. Continue up mountain and Waynesboro Road turns into Charmian Road. Total distance about 5 miles.
Starting at Old Waynesboro Road and Route 16. Continue up mountain and Waynesboro Road turns into Charmian Road. Total distance about 5 miles.
After moving out of Emmitsburg, Maryland, Union General Judson Kilpatrick moves along the Emmitsburg and Waynesboro Turnpike. As he nears Fountaindale, he will order a small portion of the 5th Michigan Cavalry up Jacks Mountain Road. The rest of Kilpatrick’s Cavalry Division will continue its movements westward headed toward South Mountain.
After moving out of Emmitsburg, Maryland, Union General Judson Kilpatrick moves along the Emmitsburg and Waynesboro Turnpike. As he nears Fountaindale, he will order a small portion of the 5th Michigan Cavalry up Jacks Mountain Road. The rest of Kilpatrick’s Cavalry Division will continue its movements westward headed toward South Mountain. (Fountaindale)
As the flankers (5th Michigan Cavalry) move up Jacks Mountain, they near the top to find it barricaded closed with at least two companies of the 11th Virginia Cavalry guarding the mountain pass. Not much is written except for the fact that this flanking movement was not able to break through the barricade and they will reunite with Colonel Alger near midnight once he is fully engaged at Monterey Pass.
As the flankers (5th Michigan Cavalry) move up Jacks Mountain, they near the top to find it barricaded closed with at least two companies of the 11th Virginia Cavalry guarding the mountain pass. Not much is written except for the fact that this flanking movement was not able to break through the barricade and they will reunite with Colonel Alger near midnight once he is fully engaged at Monterey Pass. (Top of Jacks Mountain Road looking toward Gettysburg)

As Kilpatrick begins to close in on the base of the mountain, the advance of General George Custer’s Brigade begin to skirmish with a small Confederate detail under the command of Confederate Sergeant Spencer of the First Maryland Cavalry. Several spent Spencer cases (fired shells) have been found to the right of the road where the small rise is.

This is the first curve that led to Monterey Pass along the Emmitsburg and Waynesboro Turnpike. Charles Buhrman a local farmer noted that his farm was located just passed this first turn. This is also the same area where Hitty Zulinger warns the Union cavalry that Confederate artillery was planted in the middle of the road at the summit.
This is the first curve that led to Monterey Pass along the Emmitsburg and Waynesboro Turnpike. Charles Buhrman a local farmer noted that his farm was located just passed this first turn. This is also the same area where Hitty Zulinger warns the Union cavalry that Confederate artillery was planted in the middle of the road at the summit. (Parking lot of the Fountaindale Fire Department)
Kilpatrick was recalled by Buhrman as saying the heights his right and the ravine to his left would make it difficult to deploy artillery if he was attacked.
Kilpatrick was recalled by Buhrman as saying the heights his right and the ravine to his left would make it difficult to deploy artillery if he was attacked. (Old Waynesboro Road)
This is the ravine that Buhrman quoted and is part of ISP, Corp.
This is the ravine that Buhrman quoted and is part of ISP, Corp. (Second entrance to ISP)
Another view inside the ravine.
Another view inside the ravine. (Near Fountaindale Fire Department)
As the advance of Kilpatrick’s cavalry (5th Michigan) made this turn, the last sharp turn after crossing the railroad tracks, they were fired upon by Captain William Tanner and one Confederate gun detachment.
As the advance of Kilpatrick’s cavalry (5th Michigan) made this turn, the last sharp turn after crossing the railroad tracks, they were fired upon by Captain William Tanner and one Confederate gun detachment. (Near Clermont Ave)
This is the Confederate view in which they saw the Union cavalry climbing the last hill.
This is the Confederate view in which they saw the Union cavalry climbing the last hill. (Hawley Church)
After several shots from the cannon, the Confederate cavalry charged the 5th Michigan Cavalry down over the hill to this field. (Lots of battlefield artifacts were recovered from this field) and the battle quickly dies down for reorganization. This field was also the area where Kilpatrick kept his reserves of artillery and cavalry.
After several shots from the cannon, the Confederate cavalry charged the 5th Michigan Cavalry down over the hill to this field. (Lots of battlefield artifacts were recovered from this field) and the battle quickly dies down for reorganization. This field was also the area where Kilpatrick kept his reserves of artillery and cavalry. (Near the Railroad Tracks)
This is a view of the area that the 8th Pennsylvania Cavalry came out and hit Captain Tanner by while he was withdrawing his artillery piece. The limber was captured and forced Tanner and Emack to pull back to the actual mountain pass of Monterey.
This is a view of the area that the 8th Pennsylvania Cavalry came out and hit Captain Tanner by while he was withdrawing his artillery piece. The limber was captured and forced Tanner and Emack to pull back to the actual mountain pass of Monterey. (Hawley Church)
Kilpatrick made his headquarters here at the Monterey House which no longer stands. This photo shows the property where the Monterey House once stood. Confederate prisoners were also kept on the grounds until Kilpatrick moves westward to Ringold.
Kilpatrick made his headquarters here at the Monterey House which no longer stands. This photo shows the property where the Monterey House once stood. Confederate prisoners were also kept on the grounds until Kilpatrick moves westward to Ringold. (Intersection of Charmian Road and Monterey Lane)
As the Battle of Monterey Pass unfolded, Pennington’s Artillery was ordered forward. Two of his guns were positioned here. (Lots of friction primers were found here).
As the Battle of Monterey Pass unfolded, Pennington’s Artillery was ordered forward. Two of his guns were positioned here. (Lots of friction primers were found here). (Near Monterey Country Club)
This is the area where Custer’s Brigade deployed. The 5th Michigan Cavalry was ordered to the right of the bridge while the 6th and 7th and portions of the 1st Michigan were ordered to the left. The Confederate cannon now supplied by ordinance coming up from the wagon train, kept up a high rate of fire for several hours. Colonel Alger of the 5th Michigan realizes the bridge was not destroyed sends two companies over the bridge and file off the road to the left.
This is the area where Custer’s Brigade deployed. The 6th Michigan Cavalry was ordered to the right of the bridge while the 5th and 7th and portions of the 1st Michigan were ordered to the left and rear of the 6th Michigan. The Confederate cannon now supplied by ordinance coming up from the wagon train, kept up a high rate of fire for several hours. Colonel Alger of the 5th Michigan realizes the bridge was not destroyed sends two companies over the bridge and file off the road to the left. (Rolando Woods Lions Club Park)
Fighting raged along the banks of Red Run. This creek was quoted as overflowing its banks during the battle which made the bridge and important landmark.
Fighting raged along the bank of Red Run. This creek was quoted as overflowing its banks during the battle which made the bridge and important landmark. (Monterey Pass Battlefield Park)
This is the battle line of the 5th Michigan Cavalry and it was noted that the wooded area is where lots of hand to hand combat took place.
This is the battle line of the 6th Michigan Cavalry and it was noted that the wooded area is where lots of hand to hand combat took place. (Rolando Woods Lions Club Park)
The rise in the picture is where the 1st West Virginia Cavalry was positioned before their charge across Red Run Bridge. From there, they captured the Confederate cannon and began taking on prisoners and capturing wagons.

The rise in the picture is where the 1st West Virginia Cavalry was positioned before their charge across Red Run Bridge. From there, they captured the Confederate cannon and began taking on prisoners and capturing wagons. (Rolando Woods Lions Club Park)
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4 thoughts on “Battlefield Journal: Kilpatrick’s Movements to Monterey Pass

  1. D.JEFFREY BROWN February 7, 2013 / 9:27 pm

    HI, JOHN I really liked this vitual tour . I have driven it alot but , Ialways get turned around and Im never exactly sure where the locations are to each unit.. Now I can take your photos with me as a guide. I wanted to take the time to tell you that your monterey pass book is sold out at the hagerstown cvb visitors center in downtown hagerstown. I bought the last three copies, one for myself and the other two I donated to john fyres western maryland room. I dont know if you ever get the chance to go to john fyres western maryland room but it is a amazing source of information, not to mention the fact that john is a walking talking historical guide of all things washington county. I would think everyone would know that because You have to be a pretty amazing person to produce a dennis fyre. Thank you for your unwavering protection of monterey , emmitsberg, south mountian and the rest of your precious area above and bellow the mason dixon.

    D.JEFFREY BROWN
    battleofhagerstown@yahoo.com

    • John A. Miller February 7, 2013 / 9:59 pm

      Thank you for the kind words. I am working on a 150th guide to Monterey Pass and a full bok on Emmitsburg. I have been meaning to email you, but I seem to get side tracked.

  2. gensdarmes February 8, 2013 / 8:38 pm

    Hello John, I very much enjoyed this post and of course your many other posts and articles. Keep up the good work!

    Curt Johnson

    • John A. Miller February 9, 2013 / 11:31 am

      Thank you very much for the kind words. I am going to do more with regards of photos and matching them with the historicak aspect of the site.

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